NAPSA in the News

Featured: Kareen from Project Chimps | Photo by: Fred Rubio

NAPSA is proud to share the collective expertise of its members in national and global news media.

Local Chimpanzee Sanctuary Plans Growth for Future

Diana Goodrich, Co-Director of Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest and an alternate on NAPSA’s Steering Committee, explained about the sanctuary’s expansion and the role that NAPSA can play in retirement efforts.

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Retired Lab Chimps Experience New Life at Project Chimps Sanctuary

A Georgia sanctuary for chimps, called Project Chimps, have recently welcomed a group of nine retired lab chimpanzees into their new home.

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Endangered Chimps Retire from Medical Research and Get Fancy New Home

A group of nine female chimpanzees just took a 16-hour road trip of a lifetime.

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Controversial Plan Would Send Lab Chimps to Unaccredited Zoo

A U.S. research center’s plan to ship seven lab chimpanzees to an unaccredited zoo in England is facing a legal challenge that tests the limits of the Endangered Species Act and raises questions about how research animals should be treated when they are retired.

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From Heartache to Heartwaming Friendship: The Story Behind the Adorable Handholding Chimps

You probably have seen the heartwarming viral video of chimps Terry and Jeannie at Save the Chimps, holding hands and refusing to let go. The story behind the video is even sweeter.

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About Sanctuaries

American Anti-Vivisection Society’s magazine shed light on chimpanzee sanctuary retirement.

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N.I.H. to End Backing for Invasive Research on Chimps

The National Institutes of Health announced that it would end its support for invasive research on chimpanzees and retire the 50 chimps that it had set aside for future biomedical research.

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America’s Chimp Problem

Where should laboratory apes go to retire?

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Chimpanzees Raised as Pets or Performers Suffer Long-term Effects on their Behavior

Although the immediate welfare consequences of removing infant chimpanzees from their mothers are well documented, little is known about the long-term impacts of this type of early life experience. In a year-long study, scientists from Lincoln Park Zoon observed 60 chimpanzees and concluded that those who were removed from their mothers early in life and raised by humans as pets or performers are likely to show behavioral and social deficiencies as adults.

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Boom in Retiring Lab Chimpanzees Fills New Sanctuaries with Apes

As U.S. laboratories phase out the use of chimps, former research subjects fill specially designed facilities.

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U.S. to Begin Retiring Most Research Chimps

In another step toward ending biomedical research on chimpanzees, the National Institutes of Health announced on Wednesday that it would begin the process of retiring most of its chimps to sanctuaries, though it will leave some for possible future research.

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Unlikely Partners, Freeing Chimps from the Lab

In June 2013, the N.I.H. announced that more than 300 of the 360 or so chimpanzees owned by the N.I.H. would be retired to sanctuaries over the next few years.

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