NAPSA in the News

Featured: Kareen from Project Chimps | Photo by: Fred Rubio

NAPSA is proud to share the collective expertise of its members in national and global news media.

Anthropomorphism Evolves in New York Courts, but Chimps Denied Habeas Corpus

On January 2, in Matter of The Nonhuman Rights Project v. Presti, 14-00357, the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, denied a petition that a 28-year-old chimp, Kiko, be removed from a Niagara Falls placement and placed in a sanctuary operated by the North American Primate Sanctuary Alliance. The Court held, assuming arguendo that the chimp had standing to bring the petition, “habeas corpus does not lie where a petitioner seeks only to change the conditions of confinement rather than the confinement itself.”

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Legal Personhood for Apes

This month, a court in Argentina ruled that an orangutan named Sandra is a subject of rights and not a thing. Argentina’s Association of Professional Lawyers for Animal Rights argued Sandra is a nonhuman person deprived of her freedom by being held captive in the Buenos Aires Zoo, where she displayed signs of psychological suffering.

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NAPSA Announces Hire of Program Manager

NAPSA is pleased to announce the appointment of their new Program Manager, Erika Fleury.

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America’s Chimp Problem

Where should laboratory apes go to retire?

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Chimpanzees Raised as Pets or Performers Suffer Long-term Effects on their Behavior

Although the immediate welfare consequences of removing infant chimpanzees from their mothers are well documented, little is known about the long-term impacts of this type of early life experience. In a year-long study, scientists from Lincoln Park Zoon observed 60 chimpanzees and concluded that those who were removed from their mothers early in life and raised by humans as pets or performers are likely to show behavioral and social deficiencies as adults.

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Boom in Retiring Lab Chimpanzees Fills New Sanctuaries with Apes

As U.S. laboratories phase out the use of chimps, former research subjects fill specially designed facilities.

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Allegations of Animal Mistreatment Prompt PETA to File Complaints Against Princeton

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals filed two federal complaints against the University, alleging the mistreatment of marmoset monkeys.

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Kentucky Bill Would Let Service Monkeys Help Paralyzed People

Kentucky legislators may soon debate whether to allow service monkeys to assist paralyzed adults with simple household tasks.

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Happy Father’s Day to These Amazing Primate Dads

Now, let’s hear it for the boys: the alpha males, the dads, the males who spent years in biomedical research laboratories, the entertainment industry, and the pet trade before arriving in North American primate sanctuaries. Update: This is an archived article. As of July 1, 2018, Chimps Inc is no longer a member of NAPSA.

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Kalamazoo Growlers ‘Cowboy Monkey Rodeo’ Promotion Draws Protests from Primate Advocacy Group

One person’s entertainment is another’s animal abuse. That’s the message the North American Primate Sanctuary Alliance, a nonprofit network of primate sanctuaries advocating for the high standards of care for primates in captivity, is sending to Kalamazoo Growlers President Brian Colopy and corporate sponsor Tishhouse Electric concerning a June 19 home promotion advertised to feature dog-riding monkeys herding sheep in a “cowboy monkey rodeo.”

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Rulemaking Petition Puts Primates First

A coalition of animal rights groups are working to enforce regulations for the psychological well-being of monkeys and apes used in biomedical research facilities.

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Former Captive Primates Rediscover the Joys of Motherhood

Not surprisingly, nonhuman primates have the same desire to nurture and raise their babies as human mothers. Unfortunately chimpanzees, orangutans, and monkeys living in captivity rarely have the opportunity to exhibit their natural behaviors and nurture, feed, and care for their children.

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