NAPSA in the News

Featured: Kareen from Project Chimps | Photo by: Fred Rubio

NAPSA is proud to share the collective expertise of its members in national and global news media.

What Do We Owe Former Lab Chimps?

The government and private labs bred hundreds of chimpanzees for biomedical research. But now, there’s a question over who should pay for their care.

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Chimp Chattanooga Soiree To Raise Funds For Chimps In Need Rescue Program

Nonprofit Global Action Initiatives Alliance is organizing the Chimp Chattanooga soiree to help raise funds for the nationally recognized “Chimps in Need” rescue program to rehome the Wildlife Waystation sanctuary chimps from California to Chimp Haven in Louisiana this fall.

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$1 Million donation received; 8 Wildlife Waystation chimps headed to Chimp Haven

A combination of good timing, hard work and the kindness of others has provided the means for eight chimpanzees stranded at a closed wildlife refuge to move to the lush, forested Louisiana landscape of the world’s largest chimpanzee sanctuary this year. Among the factors behind the move is a recent surprise influx of donations, including an anonymous $1 million gift.

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Erika Fleury leads effort to find homes for Jeeter and other abandoned chimpanzees

Seven months before the coronavirus became a global pandemic, Erika Fleury learned that 42 chimpanzees in the Angeles National Forest were losing their home. In her field, the news heralded a disaster. “This is an emergency,” she thought. Fleury’s team hopes to complete the full relocation this year.

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Dr. Jane Goodall Endorses Move of Waystation Chimps to Sanctuaries

World-renowned ethologist and activist Dr. Jane Goodall released a video announcing her unequivocal support of NAPSA’s Chimpanzees in Need campaign.

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Chimp Sanctuaries Restrict Visits Over Concerns About the Coronavirus

Chimpanzee sanctuaries are restricting human interactions with chimps to prevent passing a human coronavirus infection to the animals. Erika Fleury, program director at the North American Primate Sanctuary Alliance, said the sanctuaries in her organization, which all set their own policies, are “increasing precautions in order to not only protect the primates in their care, but also all the humans working at the organization.”

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N.I.H. to End Backing for Invasive Research on Chimps

The National Institutes of Health announced that it would end its support for invasive research on chimpanzees and retire the 50 chimps that it had set aside for future biomedical research.

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America’s Chimp Problem

Where should laboratory apes go to retire?

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Boom in Retiring Lab Chimpanzees Fills New Sanctuaries with Apes

As U.S. laboratories phase out the use of chimps, former research subjects fill specially designed facilities.

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Happy Father’s Day to These Amazing Primate Dads

Now, let’s hear it for the boys: the alpha males, the dads, the males who spent years in biomedical research laboratories, the entertainment industry, and the pet trade before arriving in North American primate sanctuaries. Update: This is an archived article. As of July 1, 2018, Chimps Inc is no longer a member of NAPSA.

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Chimp-Painted Art is Expressive, Even When Painted by Tongue

The Humane Society of the United States enlisted six member organizations of the North American Primate Sanctuary Alliance, and asked if a chimp at each facility would create and submit a piece of art. Modern, impressionist, abstract expressionist, still life with banana. It was their prerogative. Update: This is an archived article. As of July 1, 2018, Chimps Inc. is no longer a member of NAPSA.

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U.S. to Begin Retiring Most Research Chimps

In another step toward ending biomedical research on chimpanzees, the National Institutes of Health announced on Wednesday that it would begin the process of retiring most of its chimps to sanctuaries, though it will leave some for possible future research.

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